Tuition fees

Details of tuition fees are as follows:

  • European students are charged 4000 € per year (8000 € in total).
  • Non-European students are charged 8000 € per year (16000 € in total).

Tuition fees only cover administrative fees and the academic costs of the programme. It does not include costs for living, housing and travel. Tuition fees should be paid in full before enrolling in studies. Note that all prospective EMECS students can apply for scholarships. Scholarship details can be found here.The scholarship is the same for EU and non-EU students.

 


Living costs in Kaiserslautern

The monthly cost of living for an unaccompanied individual in Kaiserslautern is estimated at 600 €/month. The city offers a high standard of living at a very reasonable cost. Depending on your life style the monthly costs can be estimated as follows:

  • Accommodation: ~230 €
  • Health insurance: ~80 €
  • Food: ~190 €
  • Clothing: ~ 50 €
  • Leisure time: ~ 50 €
  • Internet & phone: ~ 25 €

Your student visa will allow you to work up to 20 hours per week during term time. Part time work can provide you with extra money but it shouldn't interfere with your studies. Many students work as Wissenschaftliche Hilfskraft (HiWi) for the university or nearby research centres. You can expect a compensation of approx. 350 €/month for working 8 hours/week as a HiWi.

 


Living costs in Southampton

If you are unaccompanied, the cost of living is usually between £7,200 and £8,800 per academic year (about 670 £ monthly). This should cover accommodation, food and meals, daily travel in Southampton, books, stationery, dissertation preparation and other items. Some courses may require an extra expense for material, use of laboratory equipment and final project. Depending on your life style the monthly costs can be estimated as follows:

  • Accommodation: ~ 320 £
  • Food: ~180 £
  • Clothing: ~ 40 £
  • Leisure time: ~ 50 £
  • Internet & phone: ~ 30 £

Your student visa will allow you to work up to 20 hours per week during term time. Part time work can provide you with extra money for leisure activities but it should not interfere with your studies. The temporary job agency, called the 'Temp Bank' , offers part time temporary positions at the University.

 


Living costs in Trondheim

There's no escaping the reality: living in Norway is expensive. What follows are some descriptions of what you can expect in terms of expenses while you are a student here.

  • Housing: this is going to be your single biggest expense. Even a modest room in someone's basement can cost NOK 3000 (about 345 euros) a month -- and that may not include Internet, heat or electricity. Plan on roughly NOK 4000 (about 460 €) a month for housing, more if you want more space.
  • Food: another high cost item, food in Norway is generally quite expensive. Plan on about NOK 2400 (about 280 €) a month, or about NOK 600 a week. Depending on where you come from, this may sound like a lot, but it's not -- not in Norway, anyway.
  • Transport: this can be quite variable, but you should plan on at least NOK 500 a month. A 30-day pass on the bus system, AtB, costs NOK 390. There are other options available, listed on the bus webpages. For travel a little farther afield, you can use a regional bus system, Nor-Way, or the national train system, NSB. If you book your train in advance you can get a heavily reduced fare called a minipris.

A non-European student may work part-time for up to 20 hours per week when a work permit is granted. An application for a work permit should usually be accompanied by a statement from the university confirming that the work will not affect the study progress. A letter from the employer stating that the student has a job offer should also be submitted. Students are normally allowed to work full time during semester breaks. Please note that the university doesn't have an on-campus student work schemes, and foreign students will have to compete on the regular job market.